My Top Ten Cardinals of All-Time:#7 Joe Medwick

#7. Joe Medwick
#8. Jim Bottomley
#9. Enos Slaughter
#10. Ken Boyer

Joe Medwick

Making my list at #7 is left fielder, Joe Medwick.

Medwick debuted with Cardinals in 1932. His aggressiveness, competitive spirit, and hard-nosed style of play exemplified the Cardinals 1930s Gas House Gang. He was nicknamed “Ducky Wucky”, or just “Ducky”, because of his waddle when he walked. His build also led him to be called “Muscles”.

Despite his often surely demeanor, Medwick was an outstanding and feared hitter. He holds the major league record for consecutive seasons with 40 or more doubles with 7 from 1933 through 1939.

On June 29, 1935, Medwick hit for the cycle against the Cincinnati Reds at Crosley Field, going 4-5 with 3 RBI and 3 runs scored. Despite his effort, the Redbirds lost 8-6.

Joe Medwick

Medwick’s well-known temper was at the root of two of his most infamous moments.

The first was during Game 7 of the 1934 World Series. Medwick slid into third with spikes high and spiked Tiger third baseman Marv Owen. A struggle ensued, but neither player was ejected. When Medwick returned to left field in the bottom of the 6th inning, Detroit fans barraged him with fruit, bottles, and other garbage. Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis had Medwick removed from the game for his own saftey.

The second incident happened six days after Medwick was traded from the Cardinals to the Brooklyn Dodgers in the middle of the 1940 season. The Cardinals were in Brooklyn for a series when Medwick, Dodger manager Leo Durocher, and Cardinal pitcher Bob Bowman got into an argument at a New York hotel. In the next game, Bowman hit Medwick in the temple with a fastball and knocked him out cold with a sever concussion. While Medwick played for another several years after this incident, he was never the same player. The photo below is from that incident.

Joe Medwick

From a statistical standpoint, Medwick ranks 4th in doubles, 8th in triples, 11th in home runs, 8th in RBI, 4th in BA, and 9th in OPS all-time for the Cardinals. He played in 6 All-Star games as a Cardinal, helped lead the Cardinals to victory in the 1936 World Series, and won the NL MVP in 1937.

One of Medwick’s greatest achievements was his performance in the 1937 season. Not only did his win the MVP that year, but he won the NL Triple Crown. He is currently the last NL player to accomplished this feat.

Year    G    AB    R     H   2B  3B   HR  RBI  SB     BA    OPS
1932   26   106   13    37   12   1    2   12   3  0.349  0.905
1933  148   595   92   182   40  10   18   98   5  0.306  0.835
1934  149   620  110   198   40  18   18  106   3  0.319  0.872
1935  154   634  132   224   46  13   23  126   4  0.353  0.962
1936  155   636  115   223   64  13   18  138   3  0.351  0.964
1937  156   633  111   237   56  10   31  154   4  0.374  1.056
1938  146   590  100   190   47   8   21  122   0  0.322  0.905
1939  150   606   98   201   48   8   14  117   6  0.332  0.886
1940   37   158   21    48   12   0    3   20   0  0.304  0.766
1947   75   150   19    46   12   0    4   28   0  0.307  0.840
1948   20    19    0     4    0   0    0    2   0  0.211  0.461
STL  1216  4747  811  1590  377  81  152  923  28  0.335  0.917

Joe Medwick Hall of Fame Plaque
Medwick was elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers in 1968.

The funniest quote I read from Joe Medwick was from a USO tour in 1944. Medwick was among several individuals given an audience by Pope Pius XII. Upon being asked by the Pope what his vocation was, Medwick replied, “Your Holiness, I’m Joe Medwick. I, too, used to be a Cardinal.”

Up next, my hardest post at #6…


Links
Joe Medwick Wikipedia Page
Baseball Reference Entry on Joe Medwick
Baseball Hall of Fame Page on Joe Medwick

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s